Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Why I Hate Pugs

Back to work today to start a new week! I generally work the afternoon shift, so there were already several animals in the treatment area by the time I got there: a pair of black Lionhead rabbits (drop-offs*), a cat with a leg injury, an extremely lethargic and sick cat, and a pug with probable kidney disease that had been with us through the weekend.

Which leads me to today's topic of discussion. We've been seeing a lot of pugs at the hospital lately, fortunately mostly for routine exams. For some reason, everyone seems to think that they are the most adorable little creatures to ever bless us with their presence—everyone, that is, except for me.

This is how everyone else apparently sees pugs.

 I am a tiny and adorable creature, please love me.

This is how I see pugs.

herp derp
 
Now before I get slammed by pug-lovers, which seem to number in the tens of billions, let me explain my rationale. All modern dog breeds are descended from gray wolves that were domesticated roughly 15,000 years ago. Since then, they have been selectively bred to exhibit an astounding variety of physical and temperamental traits.

The relationship of dogs and humans is one of mutual exchange and benefit. Dogs provide us with some form of specialized work or service that we are incapable of providing ourselves, and in return, we provide dogs with food and shelter, which, likewise, they are unable to provide themselves. The vast majority of modern dog breeds adhere to this time-honored symbiosis by protecting us, hunting with us, herding our sheep, getting rid of pests, or even fetching and carrying things for us.

And then there are the toy dogs. As their name implies, they are small. And, as their name also implies, they exist solely for our amusement. They have been refined and pruned over thousands of generations to look as un-wolfish and ridiculous as possible. The quest for their convenient lap-warming size has twisted their proportions, shrinking down their entire physical structure, except for their brains and, for some reason, their eyeballs.

Their poor, poor faces have been squashed beyond all recognition, collapsing their sinus cavity in on itself, and removing the natural buffer between what they stick their nose in (which is everything) and their already bulging eyes. I've seen pugs at our hospital with eyes that have become so dry that they thicken and scale up and become completely clouded over and useless. They're prone to life-threatening infections. One of our regular pugs had to have his eye completely removed because it was such a problem. And even if their eyes are healthy, they're always pointing in completely different directions and look utterly ridiculous.

Please sir, can I have a real face?

Because pugs are brachycephalic, they are prone to breathing difficulties. I don't think I've ever seen a pug that is not constantly making some kind of horrific snorting or sucking noise as it tries to breathe. Now, think back to the last time you laughed so hard you started snorting. Or if you've ever gotten any kind of liquid up your nose. It was kind of unpleasant, wasn't it? Pugs are cursed to doing that for their entire life. Every moment of every day they are struggling to breathe, even in their sleep. I've never met a  pug that wasn't constantly choking on its own epiglottis. And because their mouths are too small for their tongues, they're forced to wander around with their cracked and lifeless tongue hanging out forever.

Pugs also have terrible, terrible skin issues. The folds around their faces and their paws are prone to chronic bacterial and fungal infections. They tend to drag their feet, so any time they take a step on pavement, they're making direct contact with the ground without the protection of their paw pads. We're currently treating a pug who drags his back foot so badly that he's developed a huge, thick scab covering an infected wound that goes halfway up to his tarsus and his toenail is completely gone. The area is so degraded that it's beginning to impact the metatarsal bone, and eventual amputation of the digit and perhaps the entire limb is a very real possibility.

People say they like pugs for their personality. I have yet to meet a pug with any sort of personality. They just wiggle. Constantly. They get up in your face and snort on you and wiggle. Then they do a lap around the room and come right back and snort and wiggle some more. They seem like they're constantly in a panic. Maybe because they can't breathe.

I feel sorry for pugs. They didn't ask to be the way they are. But I can't help feeling a little bit of resentment for pug owners. By buying pugs, they're just contributing to the breeding of more miserable, gross little pugs who have to suffer through 10 years of health problems, and also 10 years of pug owners.

Dear god, why me?

But hey, at least they keep us in business, right?

* By "drop-offs" I mean that they were dropped off by their owner in the morning instead of coming in at an appointed time. We generally perform exams on the drop-offs sometime during the day, and give them baths, pedicures, or anything else they might need done, and then their owners pick them back up again in the evening. It's an important distinction, since the only other animals we keep in the treatment area are those that are "hospitalized," which usually means they're there prior to or after surgery, or are sick enough that they need constant care and monitoring.

22 comments:

  1. Thank you for having the guts to tell it like it is. You are not as alone as you think!
    A fellow pug hater

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  2. A+ on summarizing why I have such a problem with the smashface dogs (and cats!). If you have the time, you should go to YouTube and search for the BBC documentary "Pedigree Dogs Exposed" (there's also a follow-documentary of "Pedigree Dogs Exposed: Three Years Later").

    In fact, after reading over the posts you've made so far, I've taken the reader leap of faith and added to your feed to my RSS reader so I can receive your updates as soon as they get published.

    Keep on keepin' on!

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  3. Sad. I have had the pleasure of sharing my existence with Pugs for 7 years.

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  4. I have a pug and I agree 110% with you. Especially on the issue of their personalities. My pug acts like a hyper psycho bitch, but lacks all personality.

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  5. Are there only comments which agree with your diatribe?

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    1. I would not want anyone taking care of my dogs (yes, I have 2 pugs) who felt this way. I think a real "kickass vet tech" would treat all animals well regardless of their breed.

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    2. She never said she didn't trea them well. She fixes all of their issues appropriately. I have 2 pugs. I didn't want them my boyfriend wanted one and we rescued another... I love them but never want more. They have so many issues and the mut i got from the pound has been to the vet.... Oh that's right only for ceck ups. You can treat a dog well and not be a fan of the breed. You can be a nurse/doctor and bring a child to health even if you don't like them. Get over yourself, not everyone has to get an erection over those puppy mill disasters.

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    3. Exactly, you all buthurt because your selfishness has been exposed. You are terrible people for allowing this breed to continue existing and thus encouraging puppymills inbreeding them FURTHER. They SUFFER!

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  6. I like pugs, but I cannot disagree with what you said, I also share the feeling with english bulldogs, I have one and now I belive that people shouldn't breed them anymore because of the way they live, but then I see her happy face and her little tail I feel kinda sand and happy at the same time

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    1. Think she's happy? Yeah? How do you know? She told you this?

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  8. Gosh, I thought I was the only one... I have a retriever and am a fan of almost every single dog breed, except for pugs. The personality aspect is what bothers me the most. They simply act hyper, constantly. They seem to have no awareness whatsoever about their surroundings either. They remind me of overgrown hamsters or something.

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  9. I love pugs, they are cute. But I have the same issues as you described when I think of owning one or other small, too inter-breed dogs. I can't understand the logic behind the need to breed dogs that will be sick and not wanting to get some other genes into the pool that yes, would make the breed less distinct, bigger but would also allow dogs for more comfortable life. So nice pics of pugs on the internet for me and some non-breed dog to be adopted in future.

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  10. I have always hated pugs with a passion. You are not alone. My gf has one and it is the bane of my existence. It is the most miserable, useless pile of spoiled shit that is a waste of fucking air. It even tried to kill my poor dog! He had a bite mark on his neck, but my boy fought back hard. In a nutshell, pugs are a breesd that should not exist. And I also hate how people say thier pugs "own them". That just drives me off the wall. They are just snorting, shitting and pissing on everything piles of shit that I wat to knock across the head. And im a dog lover!

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  11. Thanks for your comment! I also say this and its true!

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  12. I've seen some nasty pugs, but I've also seen some really healthy pugs. I'm aware of their breathing problems, but I haven't seen any of those other issues, just the awkward eyes that look absolutely foul. This is really sad and I'm glad I didn't adopt a pug :(

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  13. I dislike pugs as well. To me they are repulsive little creatures that I am afraid to touch because of their constant munching on themselves and crusted cock eyes. Not to mention their foul smell. To be snorted on by a pug is the absolute worst feeling in the world.

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  14. Their noises gross me out. And I'd a dog needs to get it's nose cut open to breathe, it shouldn't be alive. (I know not all pugs need this). I love all other dog breeds (even though I am also against English bulldog breeding) but these poor little mistakes shouldn't be the way they are. They live their life in ignorant agony

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  15. My pug has the sweetest personality, maybe you have to own and keep them around a bit to see that come out. When I first got my pug it did take time to warm up to her because she did lack personality, but now its as if she is my child. I agree with most of what you have to say, but regardless of how much you or other hate them, they are still here. It's not their fault that humans have exploited them so, they don't deserve mistreatment just because they have medical issues. If people would look up information about pugs before getting one a lot of problems wouldn't exist because you would know that they are very expensive animals. Since getting my pug she has had a ear surgery due to years of infection, she has had a surgery on her nose and palate so she can breathe with ease. She takes maintenance, daily eye drops, medication to prevent skin infections and expensive food to prevent skin allergy's. I adopted her in July 2012 and I have spent over 5,000 on her surgery, monthly alone I am spending 50-100 dollars on food and meds. So yea there's a lot to be taken care of but its all worth it to me, I love my pug.. had I adopted any other dog I would love them the same as well.

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    1. NOBODY says they need to be mistreated. Simply DO NOT BUY THEM! If a breed isn't popular its number will go down and eventually disappear. Think about them and not your sick need to be entertained.

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  16. I've never been a pug lover until I got one. From my experience, they are one of the sweetest and most tolerant breeds. They aren't gross, but almost infant like with their needs and noises. They don't smell horrid at all unless you do not bathe your pug, smell isn't an issue. In fact I know a lab whom always smells like dirt and sweat no matter if she's clean or not. However, pugs do have many health problems; some can be prevented with responsible breeding, some detected earlier on with testing, and some must be dealt with once symptoms are exhibited. No matter, they are still a great and lovely breed just as I feel the same way about Old English Mastiffs and Jack Russell Terriers. There's only one breed I cannot stand and that's Chihuahuas as I've met too many whom are aggressive, bite, are mean, anti social, piss & poo everywhere, always yapping, and not very bright.

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